Toyota 4Runner – A Brief History

Today we’re learning about the Toyota 4Runner. It all started in 1980 when a Toyota dealership owner in Wisconsin named Jack Safro wanted the 4wd capabilities of a Toyota pickup but with an enclosed cab for the cold climate. Safro contacted @winnebagorvs to make a Fiberglass rear cab for the Toyota Hilux. Toyota agreed to the partnership and they unveiled the Trekker in 1981. They built 1500 and they all sold fast. Toyota realized there was a market for this style of vehicle so they released the Toyota 4Runner in 1984. In Japan they were sold as the Hilux Surf.

Pictured here is a 1989 N60. The last year of the first generation. The 4Runner was the first to coin the term SUV and has been a staple in the class ever since. Iseecars.com named it #5 in their most reliable cars in the US list. With its versatility and longevity it’s easy to see why the 4Runner is one of the best cars on the market to this day.

1996 to 2002 Toyota OBD II Catalyst Monitor Readiness Drive Patterns

The catalyst monitor on many Toyota vehicles can be difficult to complete.  That’s why it’s important to follow the Toyota recommended drive cycle after performing actions that are known to clear your Toyota’s computer memory.

Remember, all on-board diagnostic monitors are cleared when the battery is disconnected, or when the power train control module (PCM) is cleared with a scan tool.

CATALYST MONITOR DRIVE CYCLE INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Do not turn off the ignition switch during the test procedure.
  2. Allow the vehicle to run at idle until warmed up.
  3. Drive at a steady speed between 40 and 70 MPH for 10 minutes.  It’s a good idea to stay in the middle of this range, so 55 MPH is optimal.
  4. It may take several attempts and warm up cycles to complete the drive cycle.

toyota-drive-cycle-obd-readiness-monitor-smog-check

 

 

 

1996 to 2002 Toyota OBD II Monitor Readiness Drive Patterns